Gujarat Tour Package

Duration : 11 Days / 10 Nights

Destination : Delhi » Sultanpur » Chambal » Agra » Jodphur » Udaipur

Day 01

Arrive Bhuj, check inn at hotel & later we visit Prag mahal, Aaina Mahal & Kutch Museum.

Bhuj is the main town of Kutch, another example of a fortified town characterized by narrow streets and labyrinthine alleyways, walls within walls and imposing gates towers, old buildings from the wards and fanciful carved Hindu temples.

PRAG MAHAL
Prag Mahal was constructed by Rao Pragmalji II (1838-76 AD). Rao Pragmalji appointed a famous architect, Colonel Henry Saint Wilkins to design Prag Mahal, who had earlier designed Deccan College, Sasoon Hospital, Ohel David Synagogue. Prag Mahal took about 10 years to get built at the cost of 20 lakh rupees.

AINA MAHAL PALACE
Aina Mahal Palace was built by Rao Lakhpatji in 1750 AD. Aina Mahal is a part of a large palace complex. It is a two storey building with Darbar Hall, hall of mirrors, and suites for royal family. In the 18th century, the Rao Lakhpatji sent a local craftsman Ramsingh Malam to Europe to perfect his skills in glassmaking, enamelling, tile making and iron founding. After he returned back, he constructed the Aina Mahal with the hall of mirrors of Venetian glass. The Hall of mirror has white marble walls which are covered with mirrors and gilded ornaments and the floor is lined with tiles. The design and decoration of the Aina Mahal was due to the efficiency of Ramsingh Malam. The platform above the floor is surrounded by a series of fountains operated by an elaborated system of pumps below a Venetian chandelier. Aina Mahal is a unique example of an Indian palace built in the mid-eighteenth century with European influence. Aaina Mahal remains closed on Thursdays & public holidays.

KUTCH MUSEUM
The Kutch Museum, formerly known as the Fergusson Museum, was founded by Maharao Khengarji III in 1877 AD. This museum was built by the state engineer Sir Ferguson, and thus named after him. This museum remained a private exhibit for the Maharaos till independence and was renamed as the Kutch Museum. The Kutch museum is the oldest museum in Gujarat. This museum is built in the Italian style and located in picturesque surroundings on the banks of the Hamirsar Lake. The museum has a large collection of Kshatrapa inscriptions, various archaeological objects, arms and specimens of various crafts of the Kutch region. Museum remains closed on Wednesdays, Public holidays and on 02nd & 04th Saturdays.

Overnight at Bhuj.

Day 02 : BHUJ

Full day excursion to Banni Villages.
Amidst the Desert land of infinite dimensions, are suspended, quaint little villages. These are the last villages on the India-Pakistan border. Here you will come across master craft people’ exposing their traditional art, turning our master pieces every day. Their ornaments, clothes, utensils, everything they use – will make you feel as if you have stepped into lifestyle museum leaving you spellbound.

Return to Bhuj for an overnight stay.

Day 03 : BHUJ-ANJAR-BAJANA

Morning we proceed to Bajana, enroute visiting Anjar market.

Arrive Bajana, check inn at hotel & afternoon safari into Little Rann Of Kutch.

LITTLE RANN OF KUTCH: In the region of North Gujarat, especially in the region of Kutch one of the most interesting ethnic communities is Rabaris. Once a nomadic people, Rabaris follow an interesting lifestyle and customs. Today, most of the Rabaris are settled, though some still continue to be semi-nomadic, raising cattle, camels and goats in the arid deserts of Kutch and western India. Those settled live in small hamlets either in villages or in small towns, sometimes jointly with other ethnic communities and sometimes as a single ethnic unit. Rabaris can be easily identified by looking at their women folk, who are usually clad with long black head scrapes, distinctive heavy brass earrings which hang low, stretching the earlobes. Their jewellery is modest in comparison to other tribal women. There is an interesting myth about their black wearing.

The Sanctuary : The sanctuary is well known for its group of the stale joke brown Asiatic (Wild ass), which does not live elsewhere in Indian lowlands. We can see with Little Rann of Kutch blackbuck (Indian antelope), nilgai or blue bull (India’s largest antelope) and the graceful chinkara (Indian gazelle) are other mammals. The main carnivores of the Little Rann of Kutch are the endangered Indian wolf, desert fox, Indian fox, jackals, desert and jungle cats, and a few hyenas; also we can see during the visits flamingoes, pelicans, ducks, cranes and storks.

Overnight at Bajana

Day 04 : BAJANA-PATAN-MODHERA-POSHINA

On the road to Poshina, visit the Temple of Modhera (eleventh century) dedicated to Surya, the Sun God (1:15). In Patan (+ 1 hour), the ancient capital of the Solanki kings, visit the underground wells, or baoli, home of beautiful bas-reliefs. Stop the last weaving workshop continues the tradition of sumptuous saris patola.

Patan : India has the rich & ancient heritage in fine textiles. (Double Ikat ) Patola from the area of Patan with its unique gem like qualities , gorgeous colours, designs & durability. Its very appearance lures the connoisseur of fine textiles. It has no reverse side. Both the sides have equal intensity of colour and design.

The peculiar quality has its origins in a very intricate and difficult technique of Tie dyeing or Knot dyeing known as Bandhani Process on the wrap & weft separately before weaving.

The Patola was traditionally woven in a sari length of 5 to 9 yards by 45” to 54” width. The range now extends to include tablecloth border, scarves, handkerchiefs.

Design Elements :
Essentially the design in a Patola are based on traditional motifs called “Bhat”, These designs include “narikunj”, “pan”, “phulwadi”, “chowkdi”, “raas”, “chhabdi”, “chokha”, “navratna”, “panchphool”, “sarvariya”, “laheriya” etc.
Flowers, animals, birds & human figures form the basic designs. New geometrical designs using vegetable dyes were developed and displayed at the Festival of India held in Paris, London, Tokyo, Washington and Moscow.

Also visit the Rani-ki-Vav – Patan : On the banks of the Saraswati river, was initially built as a memorial to a king in the 11th century AD. Stepwells are a distinctive form of subterranean water resource and storage systems on the Indian subcontinent, and have been constructed since the 3rd millennium BC. They evolved over time from what was basically a pit in sandy soil towards elaborate multi-storey works of art and architecture. Rani-ki-vav was built at the height of craftsmens’ability in stepwell construction and the Maru-Gurjara architectural style, reflecting mastery of this complex technique and great beauty of detail and proportions. Designed as an inverted temple highlighting the sanctity of water, it is divided into seven levels of stairs with sculptural panels of high artistic quality, more than 500 principle sculptures and over a thousand minor ones combine religious, mythological and secular imagery, often referencing literary works. The fourth level is the deepest and leads into a rectangular tank 9.5m by 9.4m, at a depth of 23m. The well is located at the westernmost end of the property and consists of a shaft 10m in diameter and 30m deep.

Modhera : The Sun temple of Modhera is one of the finest examples of Indian architecture of its period. Built in 1026 A.D. the temple is dedicated to the Sun-God, Surya and stands high on a plinth overlooking a deep stone-steeped tank. Every inch of the edifice, both inside and outside is magnificently carved with Gods and Goddesses, birds, beasts and flowers. Sun Temple of Modhera was built by King Bhimdev I (1026-27) and bears some resemblance to the later, and far better known, Sun Temple of Konark in the state of Orissa, which it predates by some 200 years. Like that temple, it was designed so that the dawn sun shone on the image of Surya, the sun God, at the time of the equinoxes. The main hall and shrine are reached through a pillared porch and the temple exterior is intricately and delicately carved. As with the temple of Somnath, this fine temple was ruined by Mahumad of Ghazni.

Overnight at Poshina

Day 05 : POSHINA

Days entirely dedicated to the visit of tribal villages around Poshina. You will have the opportunity to discover the customs of ethnic groups and Garacia Bhil and visit the temple of Ambaji, dedicated to the mother goddess Amba.

Day entirely dedicated to the visit of tribal villages around Poshina. You will have the opportunity to discover the customs of ethnic groups and Garacia Bhil and visit the temple of Ambaji, dedicated to the mother goddess Amba.

Garasia – Contrary to other ethnic groups, living in the GarasiaPoshina, at the confluence of the rivers and Aakar Sabarmati, in north Gujarat, bordering Rajasthan. Among Garasia is generally widespread monogamy marriages are contracted between persons of the same clan, but not among members of the same village and among people with family ties. Can be combined or occur as a result of a leak. It ‘s customary for couples to escape for a trial period, in which case the bride’s father is given as compensation a sum of money, if the union fails, the wife comes home with another sum to be delivered to its parent . Garasia I believe in Bhagwan, the figure of the supreme God, which is never personified. Their traditional offerings are small horses in red clay, which are usually placed under trees or near sacred rocks or water sources, elements that are associated with the strength of spirits. Little is known about these sanctuaries, religious observances and rituals related to the terracotta horses are given in case of need and help maintain peace in the life of the village.

Overnight at Poshina

Day 06 : POSHINA-AHMEDABAD (180KMS)

Today we drive to Ahmedabad. Check inn at hotel.

Overnight at Ahmedabad.

Day 07 : AHMEDABAD-JAMBUGHODA

Today we drive to Jambughoda.

Overnight a Jambughoda.

Day 08 : JAMBUGHODA

Today we enjoy festival in surrounding areas of Jambughoda.

Overnight at Jambughoda

Day 09 : JAMBUGHODA

Today we enjoy festival in surrounding areas of Jambughoda.

Overnight at Jambughoda

Day 10 : JAMBUGHODA -KAWANT FESTIVAL -JAMBUGHODA

Morning proceed for Kavant fair – Kavant is a harvest festival celebrated with wild abandon through dance primordial blending the rhythm with the shashaying of the forest and the frolicking of the animals in the undergrowth. Surrounded by the beating of drums, the susurrations of a variety of flutes and the stamping of feet, the Rathvas dance in a vast group keeping time to the rise and fall of the crescendo of arrhythmic music in their tryst with destiny. The men folk wear a belt attached with pebble filled gourds and a string of brass bells. As they stamp their feet and gyrate their hips the bells and the pebbled gourds add percussion metronomical beats tintinabulating in the air. Some of the men carry cane sugar signifying the harvest and wear an elaborate headgear which is a conical hat stuck with small framed photos of local deities surrounded by an array of peacock feathers. Rice paste and ash are blended to make a dye painting the bodies with circles and dots in a ritualistic salutation to the jungle cat. Some men and women gather together to form a human pyramid and the surrounding atmosphere rides with the heightened energy and human spirit.

Overnight at Jambughoda

Day 11 : JAMBUGHODA – VADODARA AIRPORT

Today we take a flight from Vadodara airport.

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